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Top Attractions in lisbon

TORRE DE BELÉM

TORRE DE BELÉM

Arguably Lisbon’s most iconic landmark, the Belém Tower was completed in 1515 to provide a strategic defensive point on the River Tagus, controlling the entrance to Lisbon’s harbour and indeed the city itself. Resembling a chess piece, the tower is perhaps one of the best examples of Manueline architectural style and a climb to the turrets provides a wonderful vantage point over the river and the city sprawling out beneath.
ALFAMA

ALFAMA

Lisbon’s oldest and most historic district, Alfama perches high above the city and is a picturesque mix of steep, narrow, cobbled streets and historic buildings, influenced indelibly by the area’s Moorish origins. Home to a number of Lisbon’s main landmarks including the Cathedral, Castelo de São Jorge and Church of Santa Engracia, the Alfama is also renowned for its many Fado shows. Hop on and off the yellow Tram 28 to enjoy Alfama at its atmospheric best.
SÉ CATHEDRAL

SÉ CATHEDRAL

One of the oldest buildings in the city, Lisbon’s Sé Cathedral was built in 1150 on the site of a former mosque soon after the city was retaken from the Moors, yet was badly damaged during the earthquake of 1755. A recognisable Lisbon landmark thanks to its two distinctive Romanesque towers, there’s some interesting interior items of note including a tranquil Gothic cloister and the treasury, containing statues, relics, silverware and manuscripts.
CASTELO DE SÃO JORGE

CASTELO DE SÃO JORGE

For centuries the principal residence of the Portuguese monarchy, the Castelo de São Jorge (St George’s Castle) sits majestically atop the highest of Lisbon’s seven hills overlooking the Alfama district. Built by the Visigoths, fortified by the Moors and Romans and occupied by Christians, kings and convicts, the castle is steeped in history and an essential addition to any Lisbon sightseeing itinerary. The views over the city from the ramparts and Ulysses Tower in particular are unmissable.
MOSTEIRO DOS JERÓNIMOS

MOSTEIRO DOS JERÓNIMOS

Considered one of Lisbon’s finest architectural gems and deservedly recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos was constructed in the 16th century and, alongside the Torre de Belém, is a stunning example of Manueline design. Inhabited by the monks of the Order of St Jerome until the 19th century, the Mosteiro has also served as a school and orphanage and is today the resting place of the celebrated Portuguese explorer, Vasco da Gama. 
ROSSIO

ROSSIO

Officially known as Praça Dom Pedro IV, the King of Portugal to whom the square’s main monument is dedicated, Rossio represents the heart of Lisbon and is abuzz day and night with tourists, street vendors, cafés and shops. Characterized by its ornate fountains and distinctive wavelike cobblestones, the Rossio is a popular meeting point and is the setting for the city’s Teatro Nacional Dona Maria and Rossio station (for trains to Sintra) with its beautiful Manueline façade.
PADRÃO DOS DESCOBRIMENTOS

PADRÃO DOS DESCOBRIMENTOS

An essential photo stop on any Lisbon itinerary, the Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument to the Discoveries) is a vast, 52-metre-high, limestone monument shaped like the prow of a ship, paying homage to the great names of Portuguese exploration including, amongst many others, Henry the Navigator, Vasco da Gama and Fernão de Magalhães. Built originally for the 1940 World Exhibition, this replica was unveiled in 1960 in Belém’s marina on the 500th anniversary of Henry the Navigator’s death.
MUSEU NACIONAL DO AZULEJO

MUSEU NACIONAL DO AZULEJO

Housed in the stunning Madre de Deus convent, Lisbon’s Museu Nacional do Azulejo celebrates the country’s long association with ceramic tiles. Whilst you’ll find these distinctive decorative features all over Lisbon and indeed Portugal, the museum traces their history right back to the 14th century when they were first imported by the Moors, and displays intricate individual tiles as well as a number of impressively large panels, some comprising over 1,000 tiles.
MUSEU CALOUSTE GULBENKIAN

MUSEU CALOUSTE GULBENKIAN

One of Lisbon’s foremost museums, the Calouste Gulbenkian showcases a wealth of exhibits dating back as far as 2000 BC. Split into two collections, the first is devoted to its extensive ensemble of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Islamic and Asian artefacts, including oriental porcelain, Persian carpets and mummy masks. The second collection meanwhile concentrates on European works of art, boasting masterpieces by Rembrandt, Rubens and Van Dyck. You’ll also find the Centro de Arte Moderna here. 
ELEVADOR DE SANTA JUSTA

ELEVADOR DE SANTA JUSTA

Constructed in the 19th century by Raul Mésnier, an apprentice of Gustave Eiffel, the Elevador de Santa Justa is Lisbon’s only vertical street lift and connects the districts of Baixa and Bairro Alto. Rising 45 metres over the city skyline, the tower is just a stone’s throw from Rossio and a ride to the top should be considered a Lisbon pre-requisite, not least for the novelty value but also for the amazing views over Baixa below.

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