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prague

Top Attractions in prague

OLD TOWN SQUARE

OLD TOWN SQUARE

Unquestionably the heart of the city, Old Town Square is a vast open space lined by a glorious mix of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque buildings, most notably the Old Town Hall, Kinsky Palace and churches of St Nicholas and Tyn. Buzzing with visitors taking in the abundant architectural splendour, enjoying an al fresco lunch or wandering the seasonal Christmas markets, there’s a real sense of atmosphere here, day or night, throughout the year.
OLD TOWN HALL

OLD TOWN HALL

Built in 1364, the city’s Old Town Hall takes centre stage amidst the awesome architectural offerings on Old Town Square, its distinctive and theatrical astronomical clock, sitting atop the 200-foot tower, one of Prague’s most popular and recognisable attractions. The former centre for administration, today visitors can tour the council chamber, assembly room and cellars beneath the building, as well as the clock’s intricate inner workings inside the Gothic chapel.
CHARLES BRIDGE

CHARLES BRIDGE

One of the most visited sites in Prague, the Charles Bridge was commissioned in 1357 and completed in the early 15th century, an important trade route between Eastern and Western Europe across the Vltava River. Connecting Prague’s Old Town with the Lesser Quarter, the bridge is renowned for its Baroque statues and today serves as a pedestrian walkway, buzzing during the day with tourists, street artists and musicians yet particularly romantic at sunset. 
PRAGUE CASTLE

PRAGUE CASTLE

The largest ancient castle complex in the world, Prague Castle was built as early as the 9th century and fortified and expanded during the 12th to 14th centuries. Resembling a small city within a city, this vast complex includes churches, gardens, towers, alleyways and royal residences. Following the cessation of World War I, the castle became the seat of the Czechoslovakian government and is today the official residence of the Czech Republic’s President.
ST VITUS CATHEDRAL

ST VITUS CATHEDRAL

A most worthy UNESCO World Heritage Site, the jewel in Prague Castle’s immense crown must surely be the Gothic St Vitus Cathedral, one of the city’s most recognised landmarks and spiritual heart of the Czech nation. Its many treasures include the distinctive Art-Nouveau stained-glass windows, the beautiful 14th-century mosaic of the Last Judgement of Christ situated above the Golden Gate, the Chapel of St Wenceslas and the Bohemian crown jewels.
GOLDEN LANE

GOLDEN LANE

Set amidst the vast complex of Prague Castle, Golden Lane is a narrow alleyway lined with distinctively colourful houses, so named after the goldsmiths who resided here in the 17th century. Perhaps most famous is house number 22, where Franz Kafka, a prominent Czech philosopher, lived for a time during World War I. One of the castle’s most popular attractions, today the houses largely play host to souvenir and book shops. 
DANCING HOUSE

DANCING HOUSE

Completed in 1996, this unique and rather controversial building occupies a prime position on the Vltava River, its modern, twisted and curved façade somewhat at odds with its historic baroque neighbours. Co-conceived by the renowned architect, Frank Gehry, the Dancing House was originally named ‘Fred and Ginger’ for its unusual shape and today only the top floor is open to the public as one of the city’s leading restaurants.
WENCESLAS SQUARE

WENCESLAS SQUARE

Representing Prague’s commercial thoroughfare, Wenceslas Square is actually a boulevard linking the landmark National Museum and statue of St Wenceslas to the city’s former gate and drawbridge, Mustek. A focal point for the 1989 Velvet Revolution protest marches, today the ‘square’ is renowned for its Art Nouveau architecture, shops, monuments and memorials by day, coming alive at night when the revellers fill the bars, restaurants and clubs that line it.
STRAHOV MONASTERY

STRAHOV MONASTERY

Built in 1140 on the approach route to Prague Castle, the striking Strahov Monastery is best renowned for its magnificent frescoed library, containing a vast collection of some 2000,000 books (visible only from afar). The largest monastic library in the Czech Republic, Strahov is home also to the Museum of Czech Literature as well as the Strahov Gallery, containing one of the finest collections of monastic art in Central Europe.
MALÁ STRANA

MALÁ STRANA

Prague’s ‘Lesser Quarter’ or ‘Little Town’, Malá Strana dates back to the 13th century when it was home to the merchants and craftsmen serving the royal court. Situated at the foot of Prague Castle and asymmetrical in design, the cobbled streets of the Lesser Quarter are as charismatic as the Old Town, the Lesser Town Square abundant in Renaissance and Baroque architecture, with the impressive domed St Nicholas Church as its centrepiece.

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